The Yunker Group - Helping Others Make a Difference
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Giving USA: Total Charitable Donations Rise to New High of $390.05 Billion

 

Giving by individuals grows nearly 4 percent, driving the rise in total giving; contributions to all nine major philanthropy sectors increase – the sixth time in the last four decades.

 

 CHICAGO (June 13, 2017) – American individuals, estates, foundations and corporations contributed an extimated $390.05 billion to U.S. charities in 2016, according to Giving USA 2017: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2016, released today.

 

Total giving rose 2.7 percent in current dollars (1.4 percent adjusted for inflation) from the revised estimate of $379.89 billion for total giving in 2015.

 

Giving USA, the longest-running and most comprehensive report of its kind in America, is published by Giving USA Foundation, a public service initiative of The Giving Institute. It is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

 

Charitable giving from individuals, foundations and corporations all increased in 2016, while gifts by estates decreased sharply.

 

Giving to all nine major categories of recipient organizations grew, making 2016 just the sixth time in the past 40 years that this has occurred. The nine categories are religion; education; human services; giving to foundations; health; public-society benefit; arts, culture and humanities; international affairs; and environment and animals.

 

“This report tells us that Americans remained generous in 2016, despite it being a year punctuated by economic and political uncertainty,” said Aggie, Sweeney, CFRE, Chair of Giving USA Foundation. “We saw growth in every major sector, indicating the resilience of philanthropy and diverse motivation of donors.”

 

The rise in total giving was spurred largely by giving from individuals, which increased nearly 4 percent in 2016.

 

“Individual giving continued its remarkable role in American philanthropy in a year that included a turbulent election season that reflected a globally resurgent populism,” said Amir Pasic, Ph.D., the Eurgene R. Tempel Dean of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. “In this context, the absence of a dramatic change in giving is perhaps remarkable, but it also demonstrated the need for us to better understand the multitude of individual and collective decisions that comprise our record of national giving.”

 

While the political climate may play a role in some donors’ decisions to give to charity, research conducted by the Indiana University Lilly School of Philanthropy and other philanthropy researchers has long demonstrated that aggregate giving trends are influenced by large-scale economic factors. These factors ultimately affect the economic and financial circumstances of all types of donors and, therefore, their ability to give.

 

As an example of the link between the economy and charitable giving trends, giving by individuals has historically correlated with changes in such national-level economic indicators as personal consumption, disposable personal income and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index. All of these factors are associated with households’ permanent and long-term financial stability.

 

In 2016, helping to increase giving by individuals and households, both personal consumption and disposable personal income grew by nearly 4 percent over 2015. The S&P 500 finished the year up 9.5 percent after uneven performance for much of 2016 and a mixed economic picture in 2015.

 

“When compared with giving by individuals, corporate giving saw slightly more modest growth in 2016, at 3.5 percent,” said Jeffrey Byrne, Chair of The Giving Institute. “Corporate giving is significantly influenced by annual changes in pre-tax profits and Gross Domestic Product, which was up 3.0 percent, as compared with 3.7 percent in 2015 and 4.2 percent in 2014. Similarly, corporate pre-tax profits, which can be quite variable from year to year, grew 2.7 percent in 2016.”

 

Highlights about Giving by Source

  • Giving by individuals grew at a higher rate than the other sources of giving, outpacing giving by foundations and by corporations, and offsetting the sharp decline in bequests.
  • Giving by foundations rose more slowly in 2016 compared to the stronger increases seen in recent years, according to data provided by Foundation Center.
  • Corporate giving increased modestly in 2016, in the wake of slower GDP growth and little movement in the share of pre-tax profits directed to giving.
  • Giving by bequest fell sharply, following two years of strong growth. Gifts in the form of bequests frequently fluctuate from year to year and are less influenced by economic factors.

 

“In 2016, we saw something of a democratization of philanthropy,” said Patrick M. Rooney, Ph.D., associate dean for academic affairs and research at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. “The strong growth in individual giving may be less attributable to the largest of the large gifts, which were not as robust as we have seen in some prior years, suggesting that more of that growth in 2016 may have come from giving by donors among the general population compared to recent years.”

 

New to this year’s edition of Giving USA is a special section on donor-advised funds, which provide analysis of major trends in both giving to and from these charitable vehicles.

 

Highlights about 2016 Gifts to Charitable Organizations

 

For the charitable organizations receiving contributions, 2016 was a year of growth across the board.

  • Giving to all nine major types of charitable organizations increased in 2016.
  • Education giving saw relatively slower growth (3.6 percent) compared to the strong growth rates experienced in most post-recession years. In each of the years 2014 and 2014 education giving grew by more than 8 percent.
  • Giving to international affairs, human services and public-society benefit organizations all grew. This growth is in spite of relatively few widely publicized national disasters, which often increase contributions to these types of organizations.
  • Environment and animals charities; arts, culture and humanities organizations; international affairs nonprofits; and health causes experienced the largest jumps in contributions.

 

“In 2016, we saw a number of changes from patterns we have seen in recent years,” said Una Osili, Ph.D., director of research at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. “While giving to arts, health and the environment experienced significant growth, giving to education saw relatively slower growth. In most years, giving to education, arts and culture and health organizations often experience similar changes in growth rates, but in 2016 arts and health giving are both notably higher than giving to education. Giving for international affairs also saw growth even though there were lower levels of giving for disaster relief.”

Who We Are

 

Founded as Smith Beers Yunker & Company in 1995 on the principle Helping Others Make a Difference®, The Yunker Group offers guidance to volunteer leaders to help them govern more passionately, choose C-level executives more strategically, and steward funds more effectively. Team members provide behind-the-scenes coaching and advice to nonprofit staff, helping them make a greater difference in their vital roles.

 

We believe remaining behind the scenes is imperative in providing nonprofit executive search and fundraising counsel. We never seek recognition or take credit for the successes of those who devote their lives to making a difference in their communities. Whether assisting seniors, educating children, caring for the poor or disabled, sustaining the arts, protecting the environment, or any other worthy endeavor, it is their work we strive to further and their reputations we seek to enhance. We are proud to be associated with and eager to be of service to all who are involved in the noble work supported by philanthropy.

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What We Do

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We take seriously our mission Helping Others Make A Difference®.  Check us out with organizations we have helped in a variety of ways and learn we’ve developed a reputation for telling leaders what they need to hear, not necessarily what they want to hear. We like Teddy Roosevelt’s admonition, “People Don’t Care What You Know Until They Know How Much You Care.”  You will learn we care!